[Game Making Reference] Unity’s Graphic User Interface Part I – Toolbars

After we Installed Unity in our computers, we now have a new challenge. We’re presented with a program we don’t know. And we’re going to tackle that challenge in this reference. Unity is made of several important parts, but we’ll study the Toolbars for now. They’re complex and there’s a lot of information to go through.

  • Toolbars are located here:

Toolbar

 

  • Toolbars:
    • File: 
      • New Scene: Scenes are basically Levels. Every time you add a New Scene to your game, you’re adding the equivalent to level 1, 2 or 3.
      • Open Scene: This loads a Scene present in your Game files and shows it to you on the Scene screen.
      • Save Scene: Saves the current Scene’s changes.
      • Save Scene As: Allows you to choose where a Scene will be saved. Creates a duplicate of said scene.
      • New Project: Closes the current Project (Your game is a Project!) and lets you create a new one from scratch.
      • Open Project: Opens another already existing project for you.
      • Save Project: Saves your current game/project with any changes to all Scenes.
      • Build Settings: Lets you assign Level numbers and choose which platform your game will be in. We’ll talk about this in a later tutorial to more depth.
      • Build&Run: Takes your current Build Settings and launches your game in a Standalone Player. This means it’s OUTSIDE Unity now, as a real game!
      • Build in Cloud: Builds the game in Unity’s Cloud Services.
      • Exit: Closes Unity.2Toolbarfile
    • Edit:
      • Undo-Redo: These let you undo what you last did, anything, and Redo corrects a wrongfully done Undo.
      • Cut-Copy-Paste: These functions are the same as their windows counterparts. You can cut any objects or copy them and then paste them elsewhere.
      • Duplicate: It’s used for making a copy of anything immediately. No need to Copy and Paste, just CTRL+D and magic will happen.
      • Delete: Deletes an object from your project.
      • Frame Selected: You’ll have many little objects everywhere and sometimes, one will get lost. By pressing F it’ll be framed and by pressing F again, your object will get focused and you’ll find it! (You’ll use this a lot)
      • Lock View to Selected: Doesn’t let the Scene View move from the selected object.
      • Find: Moves the camera to the selected object, as if you double tapped F.
      • Select All: Selects All objects.
      • Preferences: This menu has some interesting options. For now, I’d recommend going to External Tools, the first option is External Script Editor. Look for the Visual Studio Community 2015 that you downloaded!
      • Modules: Informative menu about what you have added to your own Unity.
      • Play-Pause: You’ll start and pause your game, respectively.
      • Step: Advances the game one frame at a time.
      • Sign in-Sign Out: Lets you log in and out of your Unity account.
      • Selection: Allows you to save and load selections of items.
      • Project Settings: These options let you change things like: Gravity, how time goes by, the buttons the player will use for doing your chosen actions in the game.
      • Network Emulation, Graphics Emulation: These options are used for changing graphic/internet models so you can test your game in different environments.
      • Snap Settings: This area allows the game developer (That’s us!) to choose how their objects will attach themselves to the Grid you can see in the Scene View.
      • 3Toolbaredit
    • Assets: Assets are Resources.4Toolbarassets
      • Create: Allows you to create many kinds of assets. Let’s go through them one by one: 41Toolbarassetscreate
        • Folder: Lets you group things together.
        • C#Script: Creates a new Class or Script that allows you to write code and actually make your character and its surroundings do stuff. It’s called C# because it’s the Programming Language in which it’s written. We’ll use this as opposed to the next object, Javascript, which is the same in another Programming Language.
        • Shader/ComputeShader: These allow you to create some special effects for your game.
        • Prefab: Prefabs are objects that you Pre Fabricate to use many times in levels or your whole game.
        • Audio Mixer: Just that. 🙂
        • Material: Allows you to make certain things have the same properties.
        • Lens Flare, Render Texture, Lightmap Parameters: These are all flashy stuff for your graphics.
        • Animator Controller, Animation, Animator Override Controller, Avatar Mask: These all allow your characters to have animations and you to create them easily.
        • Physics and Physics2D Material: Allows you to make certain things have the same properties. Physical properties, mostly.
        • GUISkin, Custom Font: These refer to the Graphic User Interface and Fonts in your game.
        • Legacy: Funtions that are no longer in use or have been improved.

 

    • Create Empty: This creates an object that only has a “position”, but nothing else attached to it.
    • Create Empty Child: An empty object that is UNDER another one in the Hierarchy.
    • 3D Object: Allows the creation of simple cubes, boxes and other 3D Objects.
    • 2D Object: Allows the creation of Sprites.
    • Light: Puts light sources in the Scene or GameObjects.
    • Audio: Allows the playback of audioclips from a specific game object.
    • UI: Places UI objects in the game. For example, menus, text, everything that a user can see. Health Bars, Magic Bars, buttons.
    • Particle System and Camera: Lets you create both these objects with a click.
    • Center on Children, Make Parent, Clear Parent: Allows you to administrate how your objects are organized. Who is who’s parent, children, etc.
    • Apply Changes or Break Prefab: Whenever a Prefab is changed, you have the option to break the connection with the clone or to update it.
    • Set as First Sibling, Last Sibling, Move to View, Align with View, Align View to Selected: These all express their function directly on their names. Siblings are sons of the same parent.
    • Toggle Active State: Turns an object on or off.
  • GameObject: 5GameobjectThis Menu is more complicated. You might want to check this out again in the future.6component
  • Component:  A Component is a “property” we will use onto our objects. For example, if you want an object to be able to react to a blow, you’ll need it to be “Solid”, hence it needs a Collider so it can detect collisions and a Rigidbody, which gives it physics detection properties. Given the fact that we’re working in 2D, there’s a limited amount of Components we can use. These are:
    • Mesh, Effects, Physics won’t be used.
    • Physics2D contains the most used components in common objects.
      • Rigidbody2D allows our objects to be interactable.
      • Collider2Ds in every form allow for collision detections. You should use the simplest one you can. The more edges, the more complicated they are.
      • Joints are used to literally join one piece with another. These have several interesting functions we’ll check out later.
      • Effectors are wildly interesting. They allow an area to exert a force onto an object. Think of a Trampoline, or one of those transportation bands at the airport.
    • Navigation is used for 3D purposes
    • Audio:
      • Audio listener: This usually goes in the Main Camera and is the one to catch sounds from the environment.
      • Audio Source: Allows an object to play sounds.
      • Audio Reverb Zone: Works like a fade in-fade out effect in an area.
      • Audio Filters apply after effects to sounds. They’re CPU intensive and should only be used when needed.
    • Rendering has everything to do with Cameras in your Scene.
      • Camera adds a new camera for a second view. This can be used to show a Minimap, backgrounds, whatever you want.
      • Flare Layer is for added effects.
      • GUI Layer allows a camera to show User Interface Elements like Buttons and health bars.
      • Lights are used to set the lighting in your game as you need it to be.
      • Occlusion doesn’t work with 2D games. It’s a way to hide objects that are not visible to save resources.
      • Sprite and Canvas renderers are the base for our graphics to work. They “draw” stuff onto the camera.
      • GUI Texture and Text are used to display such things onto the scene from an object.
    • Layout Elements won’t be used often since they are mostly brought up by code or are already present where you need them.
    • Miscellaneous:
      • Animator and Animation will be your go to for making your characters do interesting animated sequences.
      • The rest of these are not useful in 2D or really too advanced to go into them. 🙂
    • Event has some interesting things. You’ll always need an EventSystem in your scenes, since they are responsible for noticing where the mouse is at all times.
    • Network is full just that. Network managers.
    • UI has more User Interface Elements you can use. Such as text, buttons, images, input fields for the player to write stuff on them, sliders, etc.
  • Window: Lets you administrate which windows are active, and where they are positioned.
  • Help: Gives access to several help resources and other small stuff.

 

Well, this was indeed a very long tutorial. But it covers everything you’ll need and you can use it as reference for any future needs. I’ll keep an eye on the comment section, in case anyone needs further explanation or coding help. Thanks for reading!

 

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